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Portuguese cuisine for beginners

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Portuguese cuisine can be considered part of Mediterranean cuisine. Its 3 axes are bread, wine, and oil. But it also has a significant influence from the Portuguese ex-colonies of Asia, Africa and Latin America (Brazilian cuisine), mostly in the use of spices such as piri piri, paprika and cinnamon.

What is the basis of Portuguese cuisine? We will briefly explain below.

1. Bread:

The bread (called PAN or PAO) is one of the basic elements of Portuguese cuisine. It is not always made with wheat flour but is frequent made of corn (especially in northern Portugal). The bread is part of very traditional dishes such as açordas and breadcrumb lentils. Among the best known you find the round loaves and medium-sized Broa de Avintes called Fogaça and "caralhotas" Almeirim. The "pão-com-chouriço" are consumed at fairs and festivals. While in northern Portugal, the "balls" are popular (bolas) they are similar to rolls but are stuffed with minced meat inside them. In this case, it is a good choice to combine with a good port wine.

2. Fish and seafood:

There are a variety of Portuguese dishes based on fish and shellfish. They eat a lot of freshwater fish. With the exception of the cod, which is very present in the Portuguese cuisine. For a better the conservation of this fish, it is usually dried with salt, since it is often consumed in areas distant from the sea.

3. Soups:

During Fall and Winter, soups are an extremely popular part of the Portuguese cuisine. Among them, we find the chestnut soup that also can be eaten sweet, green broth consisting of sausage, cabbage, and potatoes that can be paired with a good red wine and "fejoada". To achieve a good pairing, we recommend warm wines, preferably a rustic variety of Carignan.

4. Wines:

In addition to Porto and Madeira, there are also green wines from the north,  white wines and young Porto (generally made in the city of Vila Nova de Gaia), Madeira wine Carcavelos, or muscatel of Setubal, and also the red wine Borba or Dão, among others. However, wines from Portugal deserve a separate chapter... Stay tunned!

 TAGS:Ferreira Dona Antonia ReservaFerreira Dona Antonia Reserva

Ferreira Dona Antonia Reserva: a fortified wine from Port made of tinta barroca, touriga franca, tinto cão, tinta amarela, tempranillo, tinta çao, port, tinta roriz, touriga nacional and touriga francesa and presents an alcohol content of 20.00%.

 

 

 TAGS:Blandy's Duke Of Clarence RichBlandy's Duke Of Clarence Rich

Blandy's Duke Of Clarence Rich: a fortified wine from the region of Madeira and shows an alcoholic content of 19%. 

 

 

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